ADVERTISEMENT

Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Addicted Cruiser hybridtheory20's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Orange County (Tustin)
    Posts
    641
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    38

    Default Rayne Baby Killer Review

    I will post pictures later, but I am not home right now.

    Now the first thing to clarify is the setup and my measurements.
    Rayne Baby Killer drop-thru
    IndeeSZ 177mm, bushing (venom orange 81a double barrel front, red barrel/cone rear)
    Divine Street Slayer 72mm 78a wheels
    5' 9", 145lb, size 9.5 shoes

    Length:
    The shorter length, 35.25" with 29" wb, turns a freeride/downhill into something far more versatile. The shortened wheelbase creates a quicker turning board, while having the wheels splayed at the furthest ends of the board maintains a stable ride. I have only taken the board to roughly 30mph, but even on loose IndeeSZ, it feels stable(but understand that the trucks do affect this to an extent). The length has further benefit by reducing weight. My other board, a Hellcat, feels like a thousand pounds compared to this thing. Before the Hellcat, I was riding a 20lb tank DH race. Even when holding just the board, it feels far lighter and easier to maneuver in the air than the Hellcat. The length does require a shorter stance, with feet only a little wider than shoulder width for myself. Completely possible to get used to, and in my opinion, improves control over the board because you have the entirety of the board under your feet. I have had no problem with footbite until I tried learning to ride regular instead of goofy, but that is just because I had no idea what I was doing.

    Construction
    The pressing of the board into its shape is magnificent. The shape of the w concave and the micro drops perfectly flows. I will post pics later, but the micro drops do not run the width of the board, but instead only drop in a half circle right at the mounting point, increasing usable foot space. The three ply bamboo is different than the Hellcat that I have, because while the Hellcat has all three plies the same size, the BK has one ply that is half the size of the other two, reducing weight and making the board thinner, while not taking away from the rigidity. There is a slight and shallow crack in one of the bamboo plies, but it seems to have been filled in with epoxy and is sound. Overall, the construction of the board, from the subtle and harsh curves, to the shape is beautiful.

    Concave
    One of the things that people always criticize about these boards is the W concave. I completely understand why. While pushing, the raised middle completely messes with your foot. Uncomfortable to say the least. Now, to alleviate this, keeping the non pushing foot at a slight angle(picture will come later) actually keeps the w concave in line with the foot, improving comfort. This takes a little getting used to. Overall, the w concave is not the most comfortable thing in the beginning for commuting. I say in the beginning because your foot will get used to it. I have realized that the foot has no problem adapting to its surroundings. I used to commute 20mi. average a day on the DH race, which for those of you too new to remember, had a U concave that was beyond harsh, with complete flatness in the middle and sharp 45 degree locking concave on the sides, coupled with a narrow deck, which made commuting completely uncomfortable. However, I got used to it, and even within an hour of riding the BK, I had began to get used to the w concave as well. For freeride and sliding, the concave turns from something that can be accommodated into something perfect. With 9.5 size shoes, the board is not too narrow, perfect for my feet. Remember how the micro drops are only around the mounting? Well, in the front it allows you to shove your foot against it, allowing you to feel like your foot wraps around it, while still being held by the concave on the sides of the board and the W from the other side of the foot. It is a godly feeling that locks your front foot in like nothing else. For me at least, the change in momentum when sliding does not even begin to pull the front foot off the board. The back foot remains perfectly in place as well due to the W concave locking your foot in because it follows the arch of your foot; even for people with little arches, it locks in. Now, I do have Vicious grip tape which helps lock everything in, but on the center where there is no griptape, the concave alone holds a foot in place, but not like with the grip of course. I do not exactly know what part of the board does this, but it feels like the concave is responsible for the impeccable leverage on the board. In fact, I have come to find that keeping the feet directly on the board creates a sharper, more controlled lean; while placing the feet more on the side for turning reduces this leverage.

    Setup
    The set up that I have puts the board maybe 2" off the ground. It is beautifully responsive and very fun. I am not willing to go fast on the set up though, because the combination with a low deck, low trucks, and sliding wheels, makes the board too drifty to be safe. On the setup, I can easily initiate small standup slides at 7mph with little effort. The trucks, even though they increase the wheelbase a little bit, make the board turny as can be. With full lean, there is no wheelbite on 77mm wheels that i had on for a little bit, or railbite on 72mm wheels I have on now. At full lean, a circle can be made in about seven feet. The full lean is restricted by hangerbite, which doesn't matter in my opinion. The wheels are amazingly slidey when wanted, but will maintain grip for carving at lower speeds. I would not dare to carve the set up right now at 20mph+ out of fear of sliding out. People have in the past complained about the chatteriness of these specific wheels, but I prefer it. I know it sounds weird, but since the setup is so drifty and kinda sketchy all the time, the the wheels make a drastic change in sound right before they begin to lose traction. Getting used to this, I have been able to make deeper and deeper carves at higher speeds because I easily know the limit and do not have to guess. Predicating slippage is probably possible on any wheel to anyone more experienced than me, but the quiet screaming of the Street Slayers is perfect for me.

    Changes
    The only changes on the setup that I would make would be, if I wanted to go faster, to change the bushings to harder duros and change the wheels to something with more grip, maybe Reflex bigzigs or centrax, but I have no experience with either. I cannot speak for getting the board top mount instead of drop thru, because I realized that I only ever ride drop thru boards. The trucks allow the board to turn on a dime, and allow perfect leverage. With different trucks I assume that the top mount would make up for the leverage on the INdeeSZ. The ride height on the drop with IndeeSZ cannot be beaten though. It is, in my opinion, the perfect mix between being low enough to be comfortable to push for a long time, while maintaining height to not bottom out on anything. I will never take it over a speed bump though out of obvious fear. Finally, I cannot pump on this thing well. I know that it is my fault, but I have gotten used to pumping a Hellcat on Bear trucks, and the difference in truck pivot and wheelbase has thrown me off. I am sure to eventually get the hang of it.

    Conclusion
    I love the feeling of the board underneath my feet, and like BigTree's sig, it inspires confidence and is comfortable even with the harsh W concave.
    ---length: perfectly long enough for stability and has enough foot space for my shorter stance, but
    understandably can be too short for some people.
    ---construction: beautiful but has one crack.
    ---concave: my favorite part of the board, but it is uncomfortable until gotten used to.
    ---setup: fun as hell, but can throw you off no questions asked.
    My greatest realization with this board though is that I do not completely agree with BigTree's sig. I am beyond glad that the board inspires confidence, but I am even more pleased with my specific setup. It completely does the opposite. To be honest, every time I step on the board I am a little scared shitless because I know that I could slide out and fall any second. The setup is dangerous, keeps me uncomfortable as rider, and keeps me on my toes. I would have it no other way though, because this board keeps me alive, invigorated, and eager to push the thing to the limit and then push the limit further. In the short time that I have owned this board, I have learned more about weight distribution, balance, and overcoming the fear of falling than I have in five years of boarding. Yet, beyond the danger of the setup, because of the board's concave, trucks' lack of slop, and wheels' controlled hookup and release, I am strangely in control.


    I would not trade the setup for anything safer, because without the impending danger, burning road rash knees, and flawless slides, life would just be too boring.
    Last edited by hybridtheory20; 08-07-2012 at 03:05 PM. Reason: grammar


  2. ADVERTISEMENT


  3. #2
    Addicted Cruiser hybridtheory20's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Orange County (Tustin)
    Posts
    641
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    38

    Default Re: Rayne Baby Killer Review

    Pics:
    Name:  DSC00611.jpg
Views: 3571
Size:  93.0 KB
    Name:  DSC00612.jpg
Views: 2990
Size:  53.0 KB
    An attempt to show the drop. It is only right at the mount, not the width of the board.Name:  DSC00613.jpg
Views: 1666
Size:  35.0 KB
    Name:  DSC00615.jpg
Views: 1664
Size:  64.3 KB
    Name:  DSC00617.jpg
Views: 1679
Size:  49.9 KB
    Quote Originally Posted by koalakiller7 View Post
    So I left my helmet in my backyard on a table and decided to use it as a incense holder/burner. Well it looked cool at first but when I looked away for a minute and turned back my helmet was bursting into flames.

  4. #3
    Addicted Cruiser Steezy Kong's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Boone, NC
    Age
    24
    Posts
    1,213
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    1522

    Default Re: Rayne Baby Killer Review

    Nice review. Drop-through indeesz are super slidey. It's so low that getting grip with any wheel is tricky. I tried some bustin royce premiers (62mm contact patch and they've proven to be grippy on the same board with other trucks) and had them come out when just carving a couple times. For going faster I would definitely topmount the indeesz (and possibly dewedge) or switch trucks.

    Also, what's up with your bushing setup and having your kingpins facing two different ways?

  5. #4
    Moderator Shinobo Sukebo BigTreeFallHard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    That Toddlin' Town
    Age
    25
    Posts
    15,301
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    28 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    8984

    Default Re: Rayne Baby Killer Review

    Hybridtheory, good review.
    Glad to see you took the time to write out a well-thought and detailed review rather than some sparse sentences.
    Well done.


    Quote Originally Posted by Steezy Kong View Post
    Also, what's up with your bushing setup and having your kingpins facing two different ways?
    Wow, good eyes. Totally overlooked that.
    My Fleet:Loaded:Dervish,Dancer,Fattail,Bhangra,Chubby Unicorn/Roggs Dancer/LBL:Komodo&OSD/Comet FSM/LY: Switch & Wedgeflex/Rayne Nemesis&Demonseed/EW Thruster/Soda B2H 1 and 2 & Crank/Drang Dancer/Subsonic Killroy/AMwood 1/2 dance

    Quote Originally Posted by Brute379 View Post
    The deck is merely the interface that connects you to the trucks/wheels/road. It should be comfortable. It should inspire confidence.
    Quote Originally Posted by orion119net View Post
    got to dance with my buddy who's visiting from home......that sounded straighter in my head
    Do you Dancer Slalom?

  6. #5
    Addicted Cruiser Loserchief's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Germany, 20km south-east of Munich
    Age
    27
    Posts
    1,216
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    163

    Default Re: Rayne Baby Killer Review

    Nice review, well thought-out!

    So just to clarify, does the W run straight through the platform or does it flatten away towards the drops to form pockets(like in the front of a regular killswitch)
    Olson Hekmati P95 - Benett Vector/Randal 125 - 77a Black Ops Avilas
    Pavel GS - Randal 125s - Lime/Pink Zigs * Fullbag Ricard - RTX /Airflow Offset - Lemon/Lime Zigs
    Rayne Amazon - 44° Calmetals - 77mm Classic Centrax 81a * Rolls Rolls Woody 46° Calmetal - 85mm Speedvents 75a
    Five Mile P-40 Warhawk - Indi 215s - Cult lsm
    Earthwing Hightailer - Tracker Sixstracks - 60mm 78a Noskoolz

  7. #6
    Addicted Cruiser hybridtheory20's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Orange County (Tustin)
    Posts
    641
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    38

    Default Re: Rayne Baby Killer Review

    Quote Originally Posted by Steezy Kong View Post
    For going faster I would definitely topmount the indeesz (and possibly dewedge) or switch trucks.

    Also, what's up with your bushing setup and having your kingpins facing two different ways?
    I will definitely mess around with mounting, dewedging, and wheels. I took it for a garage run and was afraid to lean too hard into a turn for fear of sliding out, especially since it would have been onto my face. It is extremely fun for sliding around the structure though. The wheels are loud enough to be heard 5 stories below

    Also, I bought them off of someone for $75, and they came with two different kingpin lengths. The longer one would be scraping at the ground occasionally, so I mounted it reverse. I prefer the normal way though, so I left the front one that way. The back one does help to keep me from placing my back foot too far back once in awhile.

    Quote Originally Posted by Loserchief View Post
    Nice review, well thought-out!

    So just to clarify, does the W run straight through the platform or does it flatten away towards the drops to form pockets(like in the front of a regular killswitch)
    It flattens away. It may just be me, but one side does seem to be a little more aggressive at the end. On mine, it is the back where the random blob of griptape is, which is also right above the Rayne logo underneath. I like that more for the back foot, because the micro drop locks the front in enough for me. The whole thing could be my imagination though.


    Thank you all by the way.
    Quote Originally Posted by koalakiller7 View Post
    So I left my helmet in my backyard on a table and decided to use it as a incense holder/burner. Well it looked cool at first but when I looked away for a minute and turned back my helmet was bursting into flames.


ADVERTISEMENT



OUR SPONSORS


Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Join Silverfish